Artist, er plagiarist spotlight: David Herrero, the man who stole from Underground Resistance

Shame_on_You.pngEven if you don’t know David Herrero by name, there is a good chance you’ve heard his productions or have seen him DJ somewhere. With releases on such venerable labels as Cr2, Nervous, and Defected that have been supported by the likes of Marco Carola, Loco Dice, Nic Fanciulli, Richie Hawtin and many others, as well as having played at internationally known clubs like Space Miami, it’s pretty obvious that David has quite a bit of experience in the underground music business.

So why then, with all this experience, would he sign a track to Chus & Ceballos‘ label (Stereo Productions) with an unlicensed vocal? Cornelius Harris, vocalist for Underground Resistance, is wondering the same thing. In a recent post on Facebook, Cornelius made his feeling clear to the label owners:

“Hey Chus & Ceballos, I have to be honest, discovering that you took my voice and used it for one of your tracks WITHOUT contacting me or anyone else associated really pisses me off. Take that crap down NOW. No joke.”

We at Not Your Jukebox concur with Cornelius’ sentiment and are wondering what would drive someone to do this. Especially someone who, per his biography, “live[s] for music” and when he goes to the studio, its “with the same excitement as the very first day.” Until David explains himself, we have a few theories of our own:

  1. He didn’t produce his own track. Given the sheer number of productions with his name (nearly 600 releases on Beatport), and in light of the known and rampant use of ghostwriting in the industry, we find it highly suspect that he would actually have that much creative juice running through him (especially after listening to several of his tracks).
  2. He didn’t realize that he didn’t have or need permission to use the vocals. There is always a chance he is just an idiot, even despite his proclaimed longevity and knowledge in the industry.
  3. He just plain old-fashioned thought he would get away with it. He would have gotten away with it too if it wasn’t for those meddling kids interwebs.

Personally, I think it is a combination of all three (keep in mind, the original track is titled Transition and David’s is Make Your Transition, I mean come on). Unfortunately, in the end, I suspect we won’t hear from David and that the offending track will eventually be erased from the internet as much as possible. Even Chus & Ceballos’ reply to Cornelius was a meek and garden variety, ‘whoops we had no idea’. But I am curious, how many other people have been ripped off by this “artist”?

Feel free to let David know your own thoughts on the matter. At the very least, you can always, gently, educate him it is never a good idea to mess with Underground Resistance and that maybe he should offer Cornelius an apology.

***UPDATE***

Seems there is another very similar rip off by Gonzales & Gonzalo on KD Music.

The original track:

 

The offending track:

 

Another offender:

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One thought on “Artist, er plagiarist spotlight: David Herrero, the man who stole from Underground Resistance

  1. “Personally, I think it is a combination of all three…”. Agreed. Also agree that 600+ tracks a year is something to ponder. Not entering the merit of quality, I´m really baffled at the output of most producers today. For a working DJ/producer with anything else to do in life (eat, sleep, shower, tweet, date, etc.) that´s quite an accomplishment. Even considering how technology has advanced, it should should take a creative, inspired, driven and seasoned producer more than a couple of days to compose and polish a half-decent track.

    I know I do, but then I´m neither creative, driven or seasoned, perhaps inspired – occasionaly. So despite being far from prolific (don´t want to be), I know the production workflow and it does puzzle me how these guys do it. Maybe the rule now is going for numbers, in hopes that one or two get some traction and climb the charts. Or played by DJs in a club, or many clubs. Or signed and released by any of the equaly impressive number of labels out there. Or caught and remixed by some important name, a festival DJ or whatever.

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